CSU IP Denmark

 

Please note: These classes are also pre-approved for students participating in the Danish Institute in Scandinavia (DIS) program.

The following classes have been pre-approved for Cal Poly GE credit. Please note the expiration dates and any comments within the course description as you begin your planning. If you have any questions about these courses, please email the Study Abroad office, and an advisor can assist you.


 

Area B7/F Courses

(Approved Fall 2018 through spring 2024)

 
course prefix course title ge area credit course description

BIO

Biological Conservation and Biodiversity

B7/F

 

Understanding the basic principles of conservation is important in helping us approach the ecological challenges of the 21st century. This course explores the balance between studying and conserving natural resources, while still using them to their fullest. Other topics will include the biology, culture, economics,and politics behind conservation policy, as well as interactions with NGOs, the EU, and the red list.

 

BIO

Ice Cores and Ice Ages: Greenlandic Climate Change Case Study

B7/F

 

This course focuses on the natural science aspects of climate change during the prehistoric time with focus on the glacial and the deglaciation. Students will examine climate migration and adaptation strategies through the study of past climate developments, especially throughout previous ice ages. The course will focus on pre-human times, and the 200,000 year old Greenlandic ice sheet provides an ideal case study.

 

ERSC

Renewable Energy Systems

B7/F

 

Climate change cells for radical rethinking  of our energy systems — ultimately, a change toward 100% renewable energy systems.  But is this possible?

 

This course examines the technical, economic, political, and social aspects of renewable energy.  Different renewable energy technologies (wind, solar, hydro, biomass, etc.) are explored, and the strengths and weaknesses of different policy options (feed-in tariffs, quotas, etc.) are discussed.

 

GEOL 300

Arctic Glaciology

B7/F

In this course, we study the behavior of glaciers. You learn about glacier mass balance, the transformation from snow to ice, ice flow, ice core science, and basal processes. These are tools needed to investigate the role of glaciers in the climate system. This course focuses on the Arctic glaciers. Climate changes projected for the future indicate a larger temperature increase over the Arctic than at lower latitudes. This increases the vulnerability of glaciers located in this particular region.


 

NOTE:

  • New course added Summer 2019

PREREQUISITE:

  • One mathematics course at university level

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Area C Courses

(Approved Fall 2018 through Spring 2022)

Course Prefix Course Title GE Area Credit Course Description

ARC/ART 305

20th and 21st Century Danish Architecture

C3, C4 or C elective

 

Danish Architecture seen in a historical, political, social and architectural context, and in relation to European cultural developments.  Course lectures and field studies tie in with the issues addressed in Studio and on study tours. 


 

NOTE:

  • Architecture majors may receive C4 credit.

ARCH/ART

Ancient Art & Archeology

C3, C4 or C elective

 

This course focuses on the art and archeology of ancient Greece and Rome from c. 1000 B.C. to c. 300 A.D. and considers the formative influence of the Egyptian and near Eastern civilizations.  Stylistic and iconographical developments, as well as cultural meaning and historical context, will be emphasized. Field studies to the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek and the National Museum of Denmark will complement the course.


 

NOTE:

  • C4 credit not available for ARCH and ART students on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

ARC/ART 315 Contemporary European Architectural Theories C3, C4 or C elective

 

A survey of recent architectural theories based on selected examples of contemporary architectural design to be reflected upon through the thematic optics of important theoretical articles by major architectural scholars. The course will strengthen students' skills in verbal and written reflections on architecture.


 

NOTES:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

  • C4 credit not available for Architecture students on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

ARCH 335 Danish Design C3, C4 or C elective

 

A journey through the discourse of design in Denmark, investigating the success of Danish modern design since the mid-20th century. Students are challenged to discover not only why a design or object is aesthetically beautiful, but also what environmental, social, economic and tectonic factors have shaped its form and development. Furthermore, the viewpoints and disciplines of Danish design are considered in a global context. Students will strengthen their observational and critical skills by keeping a reflective and analytical notebook.


 

NOTE:

  • C4 credit available to Architecture and Art majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

  • C3 credit for this course expires Spring 2020.

ART European Art of the 19th Century: Classicism to Symbolism C3, C4 or C elective 

 

A critical examination of key art movements, focusing on a contextual analysis of selected paintings and sculptures by major artists of the period (Manet, Gauguin, Munch), which trace the evolution and the impact of modernity in a European context. Through field studies to museums and galleries in Copenhagen, you will learn to identify and critically analyze key works, significant artists, and main styles of the 19th century.


 

NOTE:

  • C4 credit not available for Art majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

ART

European Art of the 20th Century: From Expressionism to Post-War Art

C3, C4 or C elective

 

This course offers a study of leading modern artists (Picasso, Matisse, Kandinsky), focusing on a comparative analysis of styles and movements based on individual works of art, and placing stylistic expressions in the context of those sociopolitical and broad cultural developments that changed Europe during the early 20th century. This course includes extensive field studies to Copenhagen museums and galleries.


 

NOTE:

  • C4 credit not available for Art majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

ENGL

European Storytelling: From Homer to Harry Potter

C1, C4 or C elective

 

Discover the influence of European storytelling in modern forms of literature, from old myths to medieval legends to Grimm fairytales. The course examines various theoretical approaches and how traditional stories live on in fantasy, movies, role-playing and other modern uses.


 

NOTE:

  • C4 credit not available for English majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

ENGL

Hans Christian Andersen and the Danish Golden Age

C1, C4 or C elective

 

Hans Christian Andersen's tales are not just tales for children. His tales work on many levels providing not only entertainment but also reflections on society, technical advancement and values. The course provides an understanding of the Romantic Age and the Danish Golden Age, and of the societal and economic changes that affected life in mid-19th century Europe. Andersen's works will be analyzed through a variety of different literary approaches.


 

NOTE:

  • C4 credit not available for English majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

ART

History of European Film

C3, C4 or C elective

 

Following an introduction to early European film, this course focuses on the development of film language as well as major styles and trends in European film-making from the early pioneers to the Danish Dogme 95 movement. To place European film in context, a few major American films will also be studied. The course includes weekly screenings of selected European films.

 

PHIL

Kierkegaard's Authorship

C4

 

A study of the works of Copenhagen's most radical author, Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855). Kierkegaard's entire authorship is centered around the existential project that confronts every human being: to become oneself and none other than oneself. This course examines his witty, humorous, but also deeply earnest exploration of self-identity. We will remain especially attentive to the ways in which Kierkegaard's thought is critical of inherited ethnic and cultural definitions of self, and study how his approach is uniquely modern.


 

NOTE:

  • C4 credit not available for Philosophy majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior. 

PHIL/ENGL

Making of the Modern Self

C2, C4 or C elective

 

Focusing on thinkers from Continental Europe like Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Martin Heidegger, Hannah Arendt, and Copenhagen's own Soren Kierkegaard, this course traces the development of the conception of 'selfhood' in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will study how ethical thinking has moved from the language of duty to that of personal answerability, and how the search for meaningful personal existence has increasingly become the responsibility of the individual.


 

NOTE:

  • C4 credit not available for Philosophy majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior. 

ISLA

Nordic Mythology

C4 or C elective

 

The religion and worldview of the pre-Christian Scandinavians is reflected in the mythology preserved in the medieval texts and poems from the Viking Age (800-1050). The course is based on readings of these primary texts and the Icelandic Sagas that provide further glimpses in to the culture and values of the Vikings. Analysis of the sagas as anthropological source material, as well as literature, will complete the course. Throughout the semester, field studies to museums and archeological sites will help us reconstruct Viking spiritual life.

 

PHIL/HIST

Power of Thought in Europe

C2, C4 or C elective

 

This course will tickle your intellectual curiosity and hone your ability to critically analyze information coming to us from different spheres of society such as media and politics. The class has two main goals: to read, discuss and analyze some of the major European critical thinkers from Enlightenment to (post)modernity and to develop your own independent analytical skills. We will explore the theoretical and historical understandings of concepts such as truth, knowledge, and progress in readings and hands-on exercises.


 

NOTES:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

  • C4 credit not available for Philosophy majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior. 

PHIL

Religion in Crisis: 19th Century European Thought

C2, C4 or C elective

 

We will begin with a careful examination of Hegel's influential interpretation of the development of the various historical forms of religion and his analysis of religion as a form of knowing. We will then examine some of the most significant criticisms of Hegel's understanding  of religion in the works of D. F. Strauss, Feuerbach, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche in an effort to understand the challenges to religious thinking in the 19th century.


 

NOTE:

  • C4 credit not available for Philosophy majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior. 

MU

Scandinavian Classical Music

C3, C4 or C elective

 

This is a comprehensive Nordic music history course focusing on the development of art music in Scandinavia from the nineteenth century to present day avant-garde. The music of Jean Sibelius, Edvard Grieg, Carl Nielsen, and others will be compared as we examine the nationalistic styles of Nordic music in the romantic period and onwards. As part of the class, students will attend a number of concerts and workshops.


 

NOTES:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

  • C4 credit not available for Music majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior. 

ENGL

Scandinavian Crime Fiction

C4 or C elective

 

Why is Scandinavian crime fiction so popular? Is it the terse language, the Nordic landscape? Is that the protagonists are anti-heroes, feminists or outsiders? What makes these novels so appealing? In this course we will study Nordic crime fiction in which the most fantastic murders take place, dark secrets are exposed, and the validity of the Scandinavian welfare state and lifestyle is questioned.


 

NOTES:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

  • C4 credit not available for English majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior. 

ISLA

Scandinavian Moods in Cinema

C3, C4 or C elective

 

This course will study contemporary Nordic film. For years, the work of Roy Anderson, Lukas Moodysson, Aki Kaurismaki, Dagur Kari, and others have set a special tone and atmosphere in Scandinavian cinema. In this course we will study how the heirs to Bergman, von Trier and the Dogme 95 movement ask new questions and what elements, themes, and stories are typical of new Scandinavian film.

 

ART/WGS

Women, Art, Identity

C3, C4 or C elective

 

This course is an investigation of women artists and their impact on early modern and contemporary culture, with a focus on Europe. Issues of gender, institutional practice, postmodernism, and contemporary critical debate form the central components of class discussions and museum visits.


 

NOTE:

  • C4 credit not available for Art majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior. 

ARCH

New Nordic Design

C4 or C Elective

 

This course investigates the present state of design in Scandinavia — the New Nordic. You touch on design at all scales from the Scandinavian region, and the relevance of regional design characteristics in the globalized world of today are critically evaluated.

 

Throughout the course you investigate the distinction between ‘making’ — how cultural products like architecture, design, literature, film, food, etc., come about — and ‘identity’ — what these cultural products mean to individuals, to communities, and to society. Field Studies to illustrate sites in Copenhagen form an integral part of the course.


 

NOTE:

  • New course added Fall 2019

 

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Area D Courses

(Approved Fall 2018 through Spring 2022)

 
course prefix course title ge area credit course description

HIST

20th Century European History

D3 or D5

 

This course aims to provide you with an understanding of the political, economic, social, industrial and ideological developments that have shaped contemporary Europe over the last century. The organizing key issues of the course are the impact of nationalism and the wider consequences of the industrialization of Europe. Our focus will be the following central themes: industrialization and revolution, the impact of nationalism and the Great War (1870-1929), the rise of fascism and the Second World War in Europe (1929-1945), and Europe divided - and reunited (1945-present).


 

NOTE:

  • D5 credit not available for History majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior. 

ES/SOC

Anatomy of Hatred: Philosophy, Crime and Ethnic Conflict

D3 or D5

 

Hatred and related concepts such as enmity, homophobia, and anti-Semitism are often discussed in our world of conflict. The American-dominated discourse of 'hate crime' and 'hate speech' is growing in Europe. This course examines these concepts and why they are seldom examined in studies on minority persecution or causes of ethnic mass violence.


 

NOTES:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

  • D5 credit not available for Ethnic Studies or Sociology majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior. 

HIST

Conspiracy Theories and Historical Controversies

D5

 

Students will examine case studies and contested historical issues, including anti-Semitic conspiracy theories like the Protocols of Elders of Zion in Europe and the Middle East, the Holocaust and genocide denial, the 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, nd the controversies surrounding 9/11. We will also examine the differences between critical thinking and conspiracy thinking; and the nature of 'historical truth'.


 

NOTE:

  • D5 credit not available for History majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior. 

ISLA

Contemporary European Film: The Individual and Society

D3 or D5

 

This course examines modern European film from the 1960s to the present. The main emphasis will be on viewing and analyzing exemplary films in relation to their historical, social and political background.


 

NOTE:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

PSY

Cross-Cultural Psychology

D4 or D5

 

This course will introduce psychological theory, research, and methods related to the study of human behavior and experience as a function of culture. We will examine the influence of culture on social relations, family processes, and experience of the self, as well as implications for clinical psychology. Furthermore, we will investigate psychological processes in intercultural encounters.


 

NOTES:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

  • D5 credit not available for Psychology majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

SOC Cultural Diversity and Social Capital D3 or D5

 

A study of the social, cultural and political mechanisms lying at the heart of cultural conflicts, as seen from a European perspective. This course will be based on two case studies. First, the conflicts resulting from non-Western, mainly Muslim immigration to Denmark and Europe, and second, the uneasy liaison between Europe and Turkey. The course will delve into theoretical analyses of central concepts such as integration, assimilation, multiculturalism, recognition, cultural norms, identity, nationalism, and tolerance.


 

NOTES:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

  • D5 credit not available for Sociology majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

ANT/HIST

Cultural History of Travel

D3 or D5

 

Travel and tourism are not just ways of escaping the trivialities of everyday life. In fact, they can also be tools to understand and navigate a world defined by mobility, restlessness, and displacement. In the modern world, travel and tourism have become fundamental social and cultural practices by which people construct ideas about themselves and others, about society, nation, and the world both in the past and in the present.


 

NOTE:

  • D5 credit not available for Anthropology majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

POLS/SOC

Danish Politics and Society

D3 or D5

 

This course provides students with broad-ranging knowledge of Danish politics and society, exploring contemporary issues of the welfare state, immigration, and EU cooperation. Focus on Danish political parties, NATO, and international relations vis-a-vis Danish values and national identity.


 

NOTE:

  • D5 credit not available for Political Science or Sociology majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

ECON

Developmental Economics

D5

 

This course offers and understanding of the complexity of poverty and the debates surrounding the means to address it. Gain knowledge of 'international aid architecture 'and understand the drivers of change to policies and institutions. Explore new trends in financing the combat against poverty.


 

NOTE:

  • D5 credit not available for Economic majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

POLS/HIST Enemy Within: Spies and Espionage in the Cold War D5

 

Political conflict was endemic during the Cold War, yet people on both sides of the Iron Curtain were intrigued by the other side's ideology and became spies, risking everything in the process. This course introduces students to the objectives and effects of intelligence and espionage in the post-war period. The rising importance of intelligence in international politics and major players such as the OSS/CIA, MI5, KGB/GRU and STASI will be addressed.


 

NOTES:

  • D5 credit not available for Political Science majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

ECON

Environmental Economics

D5

 

This course provides a broad understanding of the economic approach to deciphering and resolving problems in the environment. By the end of this course, you should have a set of theoretical and practical economic skills for addressing environmental problems developed through a primary focus on energy use and production. You will gain a toolbox of economic ideas and examples by application to the Scandinavian and broader European environment.


 

NOTES:

  • D5 credit not available for Economics majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

HIST

Environmental History of Europe

D5

 

This course examines some of the underlying assumptions and generalizations that condition our current views of the environment. This includes the emergence of ecology as a paradigmatic science for understanding the places of human in the natural order. The most important explanatory theories of environmental change will be introduced. We always start with received ideas - none perhaps as deep seated as our views of nature and man's place in the world.


 

NOTES:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

  • D5 credit not available for History majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

POLS

Environmental Policy in Practice

D5

 

The purpose of this course is to give a comprehensive understanding of environmental politics in Denmark, the European Union, and on the global stage. You will acquire empirical knowledge about the actors, policy instruments, and policy-making processes of environmental policies on all three levels. Based on theory, you will learn through simulating debates and negotiations just how dynamic this world of politics is.


 

NOTES:

  • D5 credit not available for Political Science majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

ECON/SOC

Equality in Scandinavia

D5

 

The image of Denmark and other Scandinavian countries is one of high taxation, universal welfare, and a notable level of equality. In this class we examine the reality of that image. Are all people supported equally by the state? Can current levels of support be sustained in the face of economic pressures? The class will examine both sociological and economic theories to understand the principles and challenges that underpin the welfare state.


 

NOTE:

  • D5 credit not available for Economics or Sociology majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

HIST

European Memory and Identity

D3 or D5

 

European nations are not what you think they are. In fact, the very term "nation" is a modern fiction. There are no unproblematic ways of writing or speaking of national histories. This core course examines the complex web of historical narratives shaped by repositories of cultural memory in art and architecture, film and literature, philosophy and political thought. You have the choice of three different sections of this core course, all sharing the same overall themes. Each section is built around particular disciplines within the humanities. A highlight of the course is that you will travel with you DIS faculty  member and class on a week-long study tour in Europe, integrating course relevant destinations and topics. You may preference the following disciplines and destinations:

  • Czech Republic section: Using methodologies from philosophy and literary theory, this section problematizes the construction of ethnicity and nationality. As case studies, we travel to Prague, as well as the Danish/German and Czech/Austrian border regions

  • France section: For those who wish to focus primarily on history, travel to Paris and Strasbourg to explore how selective and sometimes contradictory historical narratives are embodied in the landscapes and cityscapes of France

  • German section: Focusing on history and art history, this course examines the tension implicit in recounting Germany's often problematic history and complex current state of affairs. Berlin and Hamburg are the sites for this investigation.

All three European Memory and Identity sections also include short study tours to the border regions of southern Denmark, southern Sweden, and northern Germany. Field studies within Copenhagen throughout the semester will augment the study of Denmark's history and culture and take advantage of the unique context of Copenhagen.


 

NOTES:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

  • D5 credit not available for History majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

FSN/PP Food Systems D5

 

This course approaches the modern food system as a complex set of human and environmental relationships, which reflect the way societies are organized and represent a microcosm of wider social realities. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we will explore a number of cultural, ecological, economic, sociopolitical, and ethical dimensions connected with the global food system.


 

NOTES:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

  • D5 credit not available for Food Science and Nutrition majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

WGS

Gender Perspectives on Human Rights

D5

 

The course will examine the human rights framework through a gendered lens. Students will learn how current human rights practices fail to account for the ways in which human rights abuses target women directly. Creating a women's human rights framework will equip women with a way to define, analyze, and articulate their experiences of violence and marginality and allow them to develop an array of visions and strategies for change.

 

SOC/WGS

Gender and Sexuality in Scandinavia

D5

 

What characterizes interpretations of gender, body and sexuality in the liberal Scandinavian context? The course explores current Scandinavian debates on gender equality, the role of men and masculinity, family structure, homosexuality, sex education, and prostitution. How do concepts of gender, body, race and sexuality intersect with concepts of normality and what are some of the new ethical dilemmas, gender roles, and ideals in a more interconnected Scandinavia?

 

ECON

Globalization and European Economies

D3 or D5

 

This course will examine the impact of globalization on the integration of European economies using economic theories of international trade applied to the EU common market and monetary union. You will gain a deeper understanding of the economic aspects of European trade, regional, labor, and monetary policy and how European economies and institutions respond to the rapidly changing global economic environment.


 

NOTE:

  • D5 credit not available for Economics majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

ARCH / HIST

History of Copenhagen: Structure, Plan, Design

D5

 

The question underlying this course is a simple one: Why does Copenhagen look the way it does? The answer is less simple, though. Cities are human artifacts whose structure, plan and design have evolved over the centuries in response to ever-changing needs and ideas. Therefore, to grasp current Copenhagen, we embark on an exciting journey into European intellectual, artistic, religious, political, economic, social, technological and military history.


 

NOTE:

  • D5 credit not available for Architecture OR History majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

RELS

History of Jewish Life in Europe

D3 or D5

 

This course focuses on Jewish life in Europe from the 17th century through the present day to examine the claim that 'the modern age became the Jewish age' and how this transition could only be possible in the context of European history. We will analyze the relationship between cultural and ethnic diversity and nationalism, the development of modern anti-Semitism, and the question of minority rights within a majority society, issues which have played a major role in the Jewish experience of reinventing tradition and constructing hybrid identities.


 

NOTE:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

ISLA

Holocaust and Genocide

D5

 

This course analyzes the causes and consequences of genocide. Specific cases of genocide and near-genocide, including the Holocaust, will be studied along with issues such as perpetrator profiles, commemoration, and genocide prevention. Definitions of genocide, methodology, and theories of the phenomena of genocide will be discussed.

 

SOC

Human Trafficking in a Global Context

D5

 

Globally, human trafficking ranks among the most profitable criminal activities. It is a violation of human rights, which manifests itself in ever-evolving ways of exploitation of people. In this course you will gain an understanding of the many types of human trafficking ranging from child trafficking, organ trafficking to trafficking for exploitation in prostitution, labor or other ways of exploitation throughout the world today. You will also learn the most important elements of legal and policy frameworks addressing trafficking at the European and international level.


 

NOTE:

  • D5 credit not available for Sociology majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

POLS

Humanitarian Law and Armed Conflict

D5

 

This course is an examination of human rights and the laws of armed conflict and how they apply to contemporary conflicts. The course finds inspiration in current events, and aims at enabling students to analyze events such as Somali piracy, the killing of Osama Bin Laden and armed conflicts in Libya and Afghanistan in a legal context. It seeks to provide students with a thorough understanding of the legal aspects that regulate modern conflicts and how they interact with the political environment.


 

NOTE:

  • No D5 credit for Political Science students on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

POLS

International Law from a European Perspective

D3 or D5

This course is an introduction to basic principles of international law and the role it plays in world politics. We will discuss current events and explore why there is often disagreement between the US and Europe on issues such as human rights, the legality of war, the UN and the International Criminal Court.


 

NOTES:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

  • No D5 credit for Political Science majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

WGS/SOC

LGBTQ in Scandinavia

D5

 

Scandinavia was among the first to respond to the need to protect the rights of LGBTQ citizens and all Scandinavian countries have introduced gay marriage. New reproductive technologies also open for new forms of kinships and presents new ethical questions. Similarly, transgendered people raise claims for new conceptions of gendered citizenship. This course explores the history of the LGBTQ movements in Scandinavia and the cultural, social, and political aspects of LGBTQ life in modern Scandinavian societies.


 

NOTES:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

  • No D5 credit for Women's and Gender Studies students on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

 

POLS

Partners and Rivals: EU-US Relations

D3 or D5

 

This course will focus on differences and similarities in political culture in the US and Europe, the role of political leadership, approach to international negotiations, and the global role in the new world order. Included in the course will be case studies of the global security issue, including the impact of China rise, the Middle East and the Iraq War, trade agreements and WTO disputes, the euro crisis and the US 'fiscal cliff' and environmental policies and climate change.


 

NOTE:

  • No D5 credit for Political Science majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

PSY/WGS Psychology of Human Sexuality D4 or D5

 

This course deals with issues related to human sexuality, emphasizing the psychological perspective. You will be challenged to think about prevailing sexual norms in Western society and how these norms originated. Examples of topics include gender and transgender issues, intimate relationships, variations in sexual expressions, fetishes and paraphilias; as well as sexual development, sexual disorders and sex therapy. By taking this course, you will realize that each person has their own unique sexuality, and will develop a greater awareness of their own sexuality and the sexuality of others. You will be trained to think less in terms of stereotypes of what a normal sexuality should be, and instead learn to think critically, challenging both personal and social assumptions.


 

NOTE:

  • No D5 credit for Psychology majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

SOC

Religion and Politics in Europe

D3 or D5

 

Is the liaison between religion and politics a dangerous one? Religion has certainly resurfaced as a visible player in politics, public life, and international relations. This course will explore the pressure on secularism — the idea that religion and politics, church and state should be kept apart in a European Context.


 

NOTE:

  • No D5 credit for Sociology majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

HIST/SOC

Royalty in the Land of Equality

D5

 

Denmark's royal family has had a significant impact on the history, architecture, urban planning, and art world of the country. But why do Danes continually support the monarchy in a country known for equality? This course will discuss the institution of the monarchy, including comparative studies of other European royalty and American first families. Why is it that people seem to need these figures in society?


 

NOTE:

  • No D5 credit for History or Sociology majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

SOC/CD

Sociology of the Family

D3 or D5

 

A sociological analysis of family structure, dynamics, and child-rearing patterns in diverse cultures. The principal objective of the course is to demythologize the family by exploring ways 'the family' is experienced by people in different cultures, social classes, historical periods and gender. To increase our understanding of contemporary family issues, we will look at issues of work-family balance, parenting, marriage, divorce, and adoption through the lens of sociological theory.


 

NOTES:

  • D5 credit not available for Sociology majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

POLS

Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism in International Politics

D5

 

This course is a study of terrorism - its causes, aims and forms - and of counter-terrorism measures introduced by the international community and individual states. The course examines the implications of terrorism for international politics in the 21st century.


 

NOTES:

  • As of Spring 2019, this course is no longer being offered.

  • No D5 credit for Political Science majors on catalogs 2017-19 or prior.

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Courses in a Language other than English

(Approved Fall 2012 through Spring 2022)

Course Prefix Course Title GE Area Credit Course Description

DAN 101

Danish Language and Culture Level I

C1, C2, C elective

 

Language ability and cultural sensitivity are closely connected in this course.  The linguistic element of the course focuses on Danish language in everyday situations, to enable students to have small conversations with their Danish family, Danish roommates or young Danes at their "kollegium". The culture element focuses on Danish culture, values and beliefs based on the linguistic evidence and on small explanatory texts in English. 


 

NOTES:

  • This is required for all CSU students. 

  • This course must be taken for a letter grade, which will be reported to the student's home CSU campus. 

  • Students who withdraw from this course without OIP approval will receive a grade of WU.

DAN 102

Danish Language and Culture Level II

C1, C2, C elective

 

Continuation of DAN 101. 


 

NOTES:

  • This is a required course for all CSU students. 

  • This course must be taken grade, which will be reported to the student's home CSU campus. 

  • Students who withdraw from this course without OIP approval will receive a grade of WU.

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